Art of Spellcasting

Back to Rules Reference

Spellcraft is different from innate powers, such as speaking with the dead, precognition, empathy, etc. Think of spellcraft as a toolset, rather than as a single tool. When crafting the spell you need for the job, you’re accessing what you need from the toolset and giving it power from a wide variety of sources. An innate power, on the other hand, is a single tool used for only a small sub-set of tasks and it draws its power from a single source that never changes. It’s the difference between a carpenter’s workshop and a hammer.

Most spellcasters have some sort of spoken component to their magic—activating words, ritual chants, and so on. These words are always in a language that isn’t their native one. If a wizard casts spells using words he commonly uses or hears in a context other than casting spells, there’s too much risk of his magical power finding expression every single time he says something, potentially creating a nasty side-effect. Putting the spells in a different language acts as a form of mental insulation, making sure that he doesn’t accidentally loose power at a target (or fry his own mind) every time he swears.

Invoking aspects can increase the power you produce or boost your control roll, and certain focus items might be able to help in either category.

Back to Rules Reference

Art of Spellcasting

Dresden Files: New York SilverSeraph SilverSeraph